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	a	Management Summary

	b	Definitions Electronic Meetings
		1	Electronic Meeting System [EMS]
		2	What Does E-Meeting Mean?
		3	Annual General Meeting [AGM]
		4	Articles Of Association
		5	Business - What Does Business Mean?
		6	Joint Venture [JV] - What does JV Mean ?
		7	Consortium - What Does Consortium Mean?

	c	Paper-based Electronic Meeting Management Systems

	d	Group Support Systems [GSS] software
		1	Definition GSS
		2	1991 Research GSS University Arizona
		3	Meeting Management Software
		4	Implementing GSS at IBM - 1990 MIS Quarterly
	
	e	Electronic Meeting Management [EMM]- ebXML Australia 

	f	References 

a Management Summary

The 1991 US research by the University of Arizona [UAz] on Group Support Systems [GSS] states that "managers spend up to 20% of their time in formal meetings and 85% of their time communicating". Consequently it appears that there is an enormous market for any process that can improve the efficiency and effectiveness of meetings and communications. The UAz Research claims >A meeting between several managers or executives may cost upwards of $1000 per hour in >salary costs alone. > >There are more than 11 million formal meetings per day (how many Agendas, Minutes >and Reports for Distribution and Filing?) in the United States alone, more than >three billion meetings per year. It is with this in mind that the implementation of the Electronic Committee Information Management [ECIM] initially by the Open Interchange Consortium [OIC] should be considered. The Open Interchange Consortium [OIC] was
formed by a number of Businesses in 1994. In Dec 1995 the foundation members agreed to develop and implement a number of Electronic Information Services including: 2 Electronic Committee Information Management [ECIM] 1 Electronic Event Information Management [EEIM] 2 Electronic Membership Information Management [EMIM] The ECIM process was initially recorded as a paper-based Electronic Meeting Management System At the 1996 OIC Annual General Meeting [AGM] 23 Jul 1996 members unanimously agreed to implement a Volunteer eCredits systems for Committee and Event Participation. The only other Australian Volunteer Credits system appears to be the 2004 Rio Tinto Volunteer Management Scheme [RTVMS] which was a Joint-Venture [JV] between with the Rio Tinto WA Future Fund and WA Department of Sport and Recreation and trialled at Mundaring Council in Western Australia The OIC Volunteer eCredits system appears to overcome the problems identified by the Report from Arizona University in 1991 > >4 Individuals must have incentive to contribute to group effort. > On 23 Aug 1996 14 Members of the OIC met for a full day at the Decision Support Centre in North Sydney to agree the Constitution and Articles of Association of the OIC At this Group Decision Support System (GDSS) meeting the limitations of GSS were fully understood by all OIC members and led to the implementation of Electronic Committee Information Management [ECIM] in all OIC Special Interest Groups ECIM and EMM have ,as their foundation architecture, the RUBAC Electronic Information Interchange [EII] Management Methodology. In 1987 the US Yankee Group reviewed the RUBAC EII Methodology as "way beyond EDI" in its Report "EDI in Australia" In 1990 the effectiveness of the RUBAC EII Methodology led to a joint-venture with the British Standards Institute which was seeking more efficient and cost-effective ways to produce and distribute the 14,000,000 sheets of committee documents each year. In 2002 the Marketing Strategy Work Group of ebXML Australia implemented ECIM demonstrated how effective Electronic Meeting Management could be in speeding up the Minutes and Reports Distribution and Agreement process with Committee Members including Standards Australia all around Australia Hence this submission that it is now an appropriate time to evaluate Electronic Meeting Management [EMM] based on the experiences of the OIC and ebXML Committees.

b Definitions Electronic Meetings

1 Electronic Meeting System [EMS] 2 What Does E-Meeting Mean? 3 Annual General Meeting [AGM] 4 Articles Of Association 5 Business - What Does Business Mean? 6 Joint Venture [JV] - What does JV Mean ? 7 Consortium - What Does Consortium Mean? 1 Electronic Meeting System [EMS] Electronic meeting system [EMS] as described by Wikipedia "An electronic meeting system (EMS) is a type of computer software that facilitates creative problem solving and decision-making of groups within or across organizations. The term was coined by Jay Nunamaker et al. in 1991. The term is synonymous with Group Support Systems (GSS) and essentially synonymous with Group Decision Support Systems (GDSS). Electronic meeting systems form a class of applications for computer supported cooperative work. Mainly through (optional) anonymization and parallelization of input, electronic meeting systems overcome many deleterious and inhibitive features of group work.[1][2] Similar to a web conference, a host invites the participants to an electronic meeting via email" Electronic meeting system [EMS] as described by Investopedia "A computer-based system that stimulates problem-solving and decision-making within a group. Standard features of electronic meeting systems include electronic brainstorming (generally in anonymous format), parallel processing, discussion tools and voting. The unique features of EMS systems overcome the limitations of traditional face-to-face meetings such as lack of participation, criticism and domination of the proceedings by a few members". Investopedia explains Electronic Meeting System [EMS] EMS systems are distinct from web conferencing systems, although both have some features in common and complement each other in the modern workplace. EMS systems confer many advantages on users, such as reduction in travel costs, increased participation through anonymity and better participant availability.   These advantages more than offset the major drawback of such systems, which is a lack of personal contact. Filed Under: Business, Economy Read more 2 What Does E-Meeting Mean? A meeting that takes place over an electronic medium rather than in the traditional face-to-face fashion. The most common form of an e-meeting is done through web-based software which allows individuals and groups from around the globe to facilitate meetings without physically travelling to an agreed upon location.  Investopedia explains E-Meeting The most important aspect to the majority of web-based e-meeting software is Voice over Internet Protocol, or VoIP. VoIP allows voice transmission over the internet, which is the key to facilitating a real-time e-meeting. Some software also allows participants to create graphs and charts in real-time, as well as record and save the entire meeting so it can be reviewed at a later date. Filed Under: Careers, Investing Basics, Millionaires, Professional Education, Young Investors 3 Annual General Meeting [AGM] What Does Annual General Meeting [AGM] Mean? A mandatory yearly meeting of shareholders that allows stakeholders to stay informed and involved with company decisions and workings. Investopedia explains Annual General Meeting [AGM] This yearly meeting is the single event whereby shareholders are able to gather and ask the board of directors questions pertaining to corporate health and strategy. Proper notice must be given to shareholders with regards to meeting times and agenda. Filed Under: Acronyms, Investor Relations Read more 4 Articles Of Association What Does Articles Of Association Mean? A document that specifies the regulations for a company's operations. The articles of association define the company's purpose and lays out how tasks are to be accomplished within the organization, including the process for appointing directors and how financial records will be handled. Investopedia explains Articles Of Association Articles of association often identify the manner in which a company will issue stock shares, pay dividends and audit financial records and power of voting rights. This set of rules can be considered a user's manual for the company because they outline the methodology for accomplishing the day-to-day tasks that must be completed. Filed Under: Accounting, Business, Financial Theory, Investor Relations, Laws, Regulations Read more 5 Business What Does Business Mean? 1. An organization or enterprising entity engaged in commercial, industrial or professional activities. A business can be a for-profit entity, such as a publicly-traded corporation, or a non-profit organization engaged in business activities, such as an agricultural cooperative. 2. Any commercial, industrial or professional activity undertaken by an individual or a group. 3. A reference to a specific area or type of economic activity. Investopedia explains Business 1. Businesses include everything from a small owner-operated company such as a family restaurant, to a multinational conglomerate such as General Electric. 2. To "do business" with another company, a business must engage in some kind of transaction or exchange of value with that company. 3. In this sense, the word "business" can be used to refer to a specific industry or activity, such as the "real estate business" or the "advertising business". Read Mode 6 Joint Venture [JV] What Does Joint Venture [JV] Mean? The cooperation of two or more individuals or businesses in which each agrees to share profit, loss and control in a specific enterprise. Investopedia explains Joint Venture [JV] Forming a joint venture is a good way for companies to partner without having to merge. JVs are typically taxed as a partnership. Filed Under: Business Read more 7 Consortium What Does Consortium Mean? A group made up of two or more individuals, companies or governments that work together toward achieving a chosen objective. Each entity within the consortium is only responsible to the group in respect to the obligations that are set out in the consortium's contract. Therefore, every entity that is under the consortium remains independent in his or her normal business operations and has no say over another member's operations that are not related to the consortium. Investopedia explains Consortium Consortiums are often used within the non-profit sector, specifically with educational institutions. They often pool resources such as libraries and professors and share them among the members of the group. Several groups of North American colleges and universities operate under consortiums. For-profit consortiums also exist, but they are less prevalent. One of the most famous for-profit consortiums is the airline manufacturer Airbus. Filed Under: Economics Read more

c Paper-based Electronic Meeting Management Systems

In Dec 1995 the foundation members agreed to develop and implement a number of Electronic Information Services including: 2 Electronic Committee Information Management [ECIM] 1 Electronic Event Information Management [EEIM] 2 Electronic Membership Information Management [EMIM] This process was initially recorded as a
paper-based Electronic Meeting Management System At the 1996 OIC Annual General Meeting [AGM] 23 Jul 1996 members unanimously agreed to implement a Volunteer eCredits systems for Committee and Event Participation agreed to develop and electronic credits system to overcome the problems identified by the Reports from Arizona University in 1990 and 1991 > >4 Individuals must have incentive to contribute to group effort *************. >

d Group Support Systems [GSS] software

1 Definition GSS 2 1991 Research GSS University Arizona 3 Meeting Management Software 4 Implementing GSS at IBM - 1990 MIS Quarterly 1 Definition GSS Group decision support systems definition by Wikipedia "Group Decision Support Systems (GDSS) are a class of electronic meeting systems, a collaboration technology designed to support meetings and group work .[1] GDSS are distinct from computer supported cooperative work (CSCW) technologies as GDSS are more focused on task support, whereas CSCW tools provide general communication support .[1] Group Decision Support Systems are categorized within a time-place paradigm." 2 1991 Research GSS University Arizona Lessons from a Dozen Years of Group Support Systems Research A Discussion of Lab and Field Findings Jay F. Nunamaker, Jr. Robert O. Briggs Daniel D. Mittleman Douglas R. Vogel Center for the Management of Information MIS Department Karl Eller Graduate School of Management The University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ, USA 85721-0108 Pierre A. Balthazard University of North Carolina Greensboro, Greensboro, NC, USA 27412 ____________________________________________________________________________ Abstract During the past dozen years researchers at The University of Arizona have built six generations of Group Support Systems [GSS] software, conducted over 150 research studies, and facilitated over 4,000 projects. This article reports on lessons learned through that experience. It begins by presenting a theoretical foundation for the Groupware Grid, a tool for designing and evaluating GSS. It then reports lessons from nine key domains: 1 GSS (Groupware Support Software) in organizations 2 Cross-cultural and Mulicultural Issues 3 Designing GSS software 4 Collaborative writing 5 Electronic polling 6 GSS facilities & room design 7 Leadership and facilitation 8 GSS in the classroom 9 Business process re-engineering Many things can go wrong with teamwork [76]. Participants may fail to understand why their goals, may lack focus, or may have hidden agendas (Figure 1). Table 1. Lessons learned about GSS in organizations 1 GSS technology does not replace leadership. 2 GSS technology does not imply any particular leadership style. 3 GSS can make a well planned meeting better; and it can make a poorly planned meeting worse. 4 Individuals must have incentive to contribute to group effort *************. 5 GSS can reduce labor costs by more than 50% and project time by up to 90%. Some people may be afraid to speak up, while others may dominate the discussion. Misunderstandings occur through differences of language, gesture, or expression. Besides being difficult, teamwork is expensive. A meeting between several managers or executives may cost upwards of $1000 per hour in salary costs alone. There are more than 11 million formal meetings per day in the United States alone, more than three billion meetings per year. Managers spend about 20% of their time in formal meetings of five people or more, and up to 85% of their time communicating [61]. One Fortune 50 company reports losses in excess of $75 million per year due to poor meetings. 3 Meeting Management Software MeetingKing "Why MeetingKing? Meetings are inspiring sessions that get everyone on the same page to help move an initiative forward. But are they? These days, it seems that the word “Meeting” often triggers eye rolls and exasperation, with many employees writing off the time as wasted. It is not that we are not willing to have an efficient and effective meeting, it is just that there doesn’t seem to be any practical and efficient tool to manage them. For years I have been looking for an easy to use solution to streamline the information and documentation processes for meetings. The current ways to set an agenda by sending emails back and forth; creating minutes in a separate word processor document; “archiving” minutes and decisions in our inboxes or on a server (a.k.a. black hole); and having no central integrated way to track tasks, is hardly an improvement over the pre-PC period of the 1970’s. There are a lot of great project management tools, but they are just not practical to manage a multi-disciplined team, that sits together once a week to discuss various different topics. File sharing in Google docs or Sharepoint may be a good way to share documents, but it is not an integrated solution to improve the effectiveness and efficiency of meetings. I needed a tool to work together, to keep track of decisions and to make sure things would get done. Since I could not find anything to run my business, and hearing similar complaints from others, I decided to build a true collaboration tool which integrates all processes and documentation before, during and after meetings. You will get the maximum benefit if all participants have a MeetingKing account (free for participants), but that is not required. Even if only one person uses MeetingKing to make notes and assign tasks, it is already effective and a huge improvement over current methods. How does MeetingKing improve my meetings? We developed MeetingKing around the natural information and work flow related to meetings and corresponding action items. All information is in one place and easily accessible to all meeting participants (both inside and outside your organization), via just one tool (rather than the up to five tolls we observed some people using). There is no need to enter information multiple times and past notes and decisions are always at your finger tips. Who and what is it for? MeetingKing is for everyone who has meetings eg: a CEOs - for executive team meetings b Venture Capitalists - for board meetings c Sales Managers - for internal and/or remote staff meetings d Marketing Managers - for department meetings e School Administrators - for management team meetings f Lawyers and accountants - for client meetings g Secretary of the Soccer Club - for parent meetings You get the idea. If you have meetings, are responsible for tasks or assign tasks, MeetingKing will make your live easier and your work more productive." Electronic Meetings - Information Net The use of genre analysis in the design of electronic meeting systems 27 Feb 2006 ... Electronic meeting systems deal mainly with communication, which suggests that there may be an opportunity to apply genre analysis to the ... Read More 4 Implementing EMS at IBM - 1990 MIS Quarterly Electronic Meeting System at IBM 1990 - MIS Quarterly Jay NUNAMAKER, Ben MARTZ Doug VOGEL - From Uni Arizona Again Abstract Businesses of the Future will rely more than ever on the work of teams. Making better use of the time teams spend in meetings will be a high priority, as will being able to adapt rapidly to change. Electronic Meeting Systems [EMS], which apply information technology to support the meeting process, can help accomplish this goal. This paper describes and discusses the implementation of EMS at IBM in an alliance with the University of Arizona. During the past 3 years, the project has grown from initial support for a single site to 33 IBM sites, with more on the way. Over 15,000 people have used the ever expanding and evolving EMS tool kit. Use of EMS has improved group performance by an average of 55%, with even more dramatic reduction in project calendar time. The lessons learned and the success factors at IBM can assist managers in effectively introducing EMS to their organisations" This is the potential of EMM for other organisations like eHealth Committees

e Electronic Meeting Management [EMM]- ebXML Australia

In 2002
ebXML Australia implmemented ECIM where it demonstrated how effective Electronic Meeting Management could be in speeding up the Minutes Agreement process with Members all around Australia Effective Meetings Why Do Meetings Have a Bad Reputation? Meetings dominate the way in which we do business today. In fact, approximately 11 million meetings occur in the U.S. each and every day. 1 Although many of us complain about meetings, we can all expect to spend our careers deeply immersed in them. Most professionals attend a total of 61.8 meetings per month 2 and research indicates that over 50 percent of this meeting time is wasted. 3 Assuming each of these meetings is one hour long, professionals lose 31 hours per month in unproductive meetings, or approximately four work days. Considering these statistics, it's no surprise that meetings have such a bad reputation. University Western Sydney Meeting Procedure Document confirms important Dates in Meeting Procedures SCC20 Steering Electronic Meeting Minutes 2 August 2011 SCC20 highlights the importance accurate time-records

f References

1 Definitions - Wikipedia and Investopedia 2
Lessons from a Dozen Years of Group Support Systems Research A Discussion of Lab and Field Findings For Group Decision Support System [GDSS] Jay F. Nunamaker, Jr. Robert O. Briggs Daniel D. Mittleman Douglas R. Vogel Center for the Management of Information MIS Department Karl Eller Graduate School of Management The University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ, USA 85721-0108 Pierre A. Balthazard University of North Carolina Greensboro, Greensboro, NC, USA 27412 3 Electronic Meeting System at IBM 1990 - MIS Quarterly Jay NUNAMAKER, Ben MARTZ Doug VOGEL - From Uni Arizona Again 4 OIC AGM 23 Jul 1996 Members unanimously agreed to implement a Volunteer eCredits systems for Committee and Event Participation. 5 OIC DDSS Meeting 23 Aug 1996 14 Members of the OIC met for a full day 6 Rio Tinto Volunteer Management Scheme [RTVMS] which was a Joint-Venture with the Rio Tinto WA Future Fund and WA Department of Sport and Recreation 7 In 2002 ebXML Australia implmemented ECIM where it demonstrated how effective Electronic Meeting Management could be in speeding up the Minutes Agreement process with Committee Members all around Australia 8 MeetingKing 9 University Western Sydney Meeting Procedure Document confirms importance Dates in Meeting Procedures 10 SCC20 Steering Electronic Meeting Minutes 2 August 2011 SCC20 highlights the importance accurate time-keetping records Home | Definitions | IEO | EEM | DEB | IES | IBM Research EMS | Disclaimer | Copyright






































































































































































































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